Motorcycle Touring Destination Info

Cambodia

Cambodia flag

Capital City

Phnom Penh

Population

~ 16,750,000

Land Area

181,035 m2

Official Language(s)

Khmer

Currency

Riel (KHR) and US Dollar (USD)

Driving Side

right

Climate

tropical; rainy, monsoon season (May to November); dry season (December to April); very little temperature change through seasons

Cambodia Fact File

Cambodia is a is a lush tropical country that is largely rural and untamed. There are ample opportunities to get off the tarmac and experience some real adventure riding. Conditions are basic but clean and the people are very warm and fun loving. Whether you want to skip along the coast or get into the dense tropical forest, you can find a route for that and combining a trip to Angkor Wat and Ton Le Sap is easy to do. Generally, tours here are for the seasoned rider who can handle some dirt and the heat which can be quite difficult to deal with but the rewards are great. Challenge accepted. Now, get over and get it done.

Cambodia FAQ

Most people can enter Cambodia without a formal visa for at least 30 days. Visas are available on arrival for some nationalities and e-visas are available for people from all countries. You should apply for an eVisa a minimum of 4 days in advance of your trip.
You can get more information and apply here: https://www.cambodiagovisas.com/
Cambodia has signed the 1949 Convention on International Driving Permits. Therefore, you need to use the 1949 version.
You do not need to show any proof of a Covid vaccination if you wish to enter Cambodia and you do not need to quarantine.
There are many infectious diseases prevalent in Cambodia and each traveller needs to assess the risks for themselves and then decide whether or not they should be vaccinated or carry medication. For example, Rabies is an issue and many rabid dogs are found in the country. You could choose to be vaccinated prior to your trip or rely on the facct that most clinics in Cambodia have the vaccine on hand. Mosquito borne diseases such as: Malaria, Dengue, Chikungunya are similar in that the best advice is often to avoid being bitten, but there are vaccines available in some countries. For better advice we suggest you consult and doctor and/or the CDC on their website for better information. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/traveler/none/cambodia We would also suggest only drinking bottled water from a reliable supplier and not using ice in drinks.
Try to bring as much as possible. We will advise you on the weather conditions when you book your tour/rental and this will inform you as to what you should bring. Nearly all items are available here but the supply is sporadic and sizes tend to be more for the Asian market. Bring your helmet, jacket, riding pants, boots, gloves and waterproofs as these are essential and size dependant. We can provide a limited range of gear and sizes so it is best to discuss this with us in advance as we cannot guarantee to have what you need. There is NO NEED to bring bungees, waterproof bags, phone holders etc… unless you really wish to.
This greatly depends on the location: rural or urban and the location: at a street stall or in a restaurant/hotel. Do not always rely on having the best facilities. We are usually lucky enough to be in places where the toilets, even though basic, are still hygienic. There may be times when we are ‘caught short’ and there is only a squat toilet, possibly open-air, which may not have toilet paper. Therefore, it is essential that we bring our own toilet products for those rare cases. We obviously do our best to avoid this.
No, it is not customary. However, as a foreigner who will usually benefit from above average service standards, it is often appropriate to tip. It is hard to get away from the fact that foreigners can be seen as wealthier than locals and therefore the expectation of a tip is there. However, it is usually due to good service and friendly attitudes that we tip workers and this is often the level of service we receive. Therefore, we suggest giving a small tip/rounding up the total in most cases in order to see that level of care is continued. In higher standard hotels and restaurants it would be normal to leave a 10% tip. It is most welcome by staff because they rarely have high salaries.
Yes, kind of. The coverage of Internet is quite broad and wifi is also readily available in many hotels, bars and restaurants. Therefore, basic communication is possible but working on large files and the like can be difficult and time consuming. Naturally, access in the larger towns and cities such as Siem Reap and Phnom Penh is much better but we will often be quite far from these places.
It is possible, but difficult, to eat vegetarian in Cambodia. Many dishes can easily be altered to become vegetarian but it is often hard to explain this clearly. You will need to explain that you may not wish to have: oyster sauce, fish sauce, eggs (in egg fried rice) or for the cook to NOT use chicken powder which is a common flavouring. There are speciality vegetarian restaurants but they are hard to come by and always in the larger towns where we are not. We can cater for vegetarians but the choices are limited and it is often best that you bring some snacks with you in case you need them.
It is NOT a good idea to either drink the tap water or lean your teeth with it in Cambodia. The quality of the water supply can be sporadic and there can be alterations to the network that the water companies are not aware of. As well, large buildings: condos, hotels, tower blocks, complexes often store water in large tanks before distribution and this can lead to contamination by many kinds of bacteria and pathogens.
Cambodia is quite safe and millions of visitors have no trouble whilst they holiday there. However, petty street crime, scams and sometimes sexual assaults do occur, particularly in the larger cities and tourist areas. You should exercise caution when out late at night, especially if drinking. Whilst on tour, we spend most of our time in rural areas which are quite safe and we are more likely to come across annoyances, if anything, rather than threats.
If you take a prescription medication, you should bring enough for your trip. Most over the counter medications can be easily found but they are often under different names and this can lead to confusion.
There are some ATMs in the main cities and towns such as, Phnom Penh, Siem Reap and Phonsovan but few in the more rural areas. Beware of the withdrawal fees which can be around 4 or 5$ per transaction.
This is during the dry season which is November to April. This is the time when you will experience blue skies, dry conditions and lower temperatures. During the rainy season it is often impossible to travel on many of the roads we use and sometimes even the mai roads. On top of this, it can be extremely uncomfortable to travel due to the heat.
Yes, you can bring a drone into Cambodia and there are no bans on the import and use of drones in the country other than the usual ones of not using them around airports and areas of national security. Use common sense and do not fly in these areas or over monuments such as Angkor Wat and you are unlikely to have any problem. However, bear in mind that due to the nature of our tour, riding long distances, you may not get much chance to use it.

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4 riders

R.E. Himalayan 400

Royal Enfield Himalayan 400 motorcycle rental
Royal Enfield’s first adventure bike: the Himalayan is a reliable, capable all-rounder.

Engine Type

air-cooled, single cylinder, SOHC, 4-stroke

Displacement

411 cc

Bore X Stroke

78 mm x 86 mm

Ignition

Digital Electronic Ignition

Fuel System

fuel injection

Compression Ratio

9.5:1

Starter

electric

Gearbox

5-speed

Front Suspension

telescopic, 41 mm forks, 200 mm travel

Rear Suspension

monoshock, 180 mm travel

Front Brakes

disc

Rear Brakes

disc

Front Tyres

90/90-21

Rear Tyres

120/90-17

Wheelbase

1465 mm

Seat Height

800 mm

Ground Clearance

220 mm

Kerb Weight

199 kg

Fuel Capacity

15 litres

Dimensions

2190 mm (L) x 840 mm (W) x 1370 mm (H)

Honda CRF 300

Honda CRF 300 motorcycle rental
The perfect balance between size, weight, power and handling.

Engine Type

single cylinder, DOHC, Liquid cooled

Displacement

286 cc

Bore X Stroke

76 mm x 63 mm

Ignition

Full Transistor Digital

Fuel System

PGM-FI electronic fuel injection

Compression Ratio

10.7:1

Starter

electric

Gearbox

5-speed

Front Suspension

43 mm Telescopic upside down

Rear Suspension

Prolink Mono with 5 stage pre load adjuster

Front Brakes

256 mm disc, 2 piston caliper

Rear Brakes

220 mm disc, single piston caliper

Front Tyres

80/100 21

Rear Tyres

120/80 18

Wheelbase

1455 mm

Seat Height

880 mm

Ground Clearance

285 mm

Kerb Weight

142 kg

Fuel Capacity

7.8 litres

Dimensions

2230 mm (L) x 820 mm (W) x 1200 mm (H)

Honda CRF 250

Honda CRF 250 motorcycle rental
Replaced in 2021 by the CRF 300, this bike remains a great choice for thrill seekers.

Engine Type

liquid cooled, single cylinder, 4-stroke

Displacement

249 cc

Bore X Stroke

79 mm x 50.9 mm

Ignition

computer-controlled digital transistorized with electronic advance

Fuel System

PGM-FI

Compression Ratio

13.9:1

Starter

electric

Gearbox

5-speed

Front Suspension

49 mm leading-axle inverted, 12.2-inch travel

Rear Suspension

single shock with spring preload; 12.3-inch travel

Front Brakes

single 260 mm disc

Rear Brakes

single 240 mm disc

Front Tyres

80/100 21

Rear Tyres

100 / 90 19

Wheelbase

1445 mm

Seat Height

875 mm

Ground Clearance

333 mm

Kerb Weight

145 kg

Fuel Capacity

7.7 litres

Dimensions

2,195 mm (L) x 815 mm (W) x 1,195 mm (H)

Honda XR 150

Honda XR 150 motorcycle rental
Inexpensive, comfortable and reliable, yet surprisingly capable off-road.

Engine Type

air cooled, OHC, single cylinder

Displacement

149 cc

Bore X Stroke

57.3 mm x 57.8 mm

Ignition

CDI

Fuel System

20 mm piston valve carburettor

Compression Ratio

9.5:1

Starter

electric with kick starter backup

Gearbox

5-speed

Front Suspension

telescopic fork, 180 mm axle travel

Rear Suspension

single shock swing arm, 150 mm axle travel

Front Brakes

dual piston caliper, 240 mm disc

Rear Brakes

mechanical drum

Front Tyres

90/90 19

Rear Tyres

110/90 17

Wheelbase

1362 mm

Seat Height

825 mm

Ground Clearance

243 mm

Kerb Weight

129 kg

Fuel Capacity

12 litres

Dimensions

2091 mm (L) x 811 mm (W) x 1125 mm (H)

R.E. Classic 350

Royal Enfield Classic 350 motorcycle rental
Wide handlebars and upright seating position, with classic styling.

Engine Type

4 stroke, air-cooled, single cylinder, SOHC

Displacement

349 cc

Bore X Stroke

72 mm x 85.8 mm

Ignition

Digital Electronic Ignition

Fuel System

fuel injection

Compression Ratio

9.5:1

Starter

electric

Gearbox

5-speed

Front Suspension

telescopic, 41 mm forks, 130 mm travel

Rear Suspension

twin tube emulsion shock, 6-step preload

Front Brakes

disc, 300 mm

Rear Brakes

disc, 270 mm

Front Tyres

100/90-19

Rear Tyres

120/80-18

Wheelbase

1465 mm

Seat Height

805 mm

Ground Clearance

170 mm

Kerb Weight

195 kg

Fuel Capacity

13 litres

Dimensions

2145 (L) x 785 (W) x 1090 (H)

Honda XR 250

Honda XR 250 motorcycle rental
One of Honda’s older dual sport offerings, replaced in 2004 by the CRF 250.

Engine Type

Four Stroke, air cooled, SOHC, single cylinder

Displacement

249 cc

Bore X Stroke

73 mm x 59 mm

Ignition

CDI

Fuel System

32 mm Keihin carburettor

Compression Ratio

10.2:1

Starter

electric with kick starter backup

Gearbox

6-speed

Front Suspension

41mm telescopic, air assisted fork

Rear Suspension

Pro Link adjustable

Front Brakes

dual piston caliper, 240 mm disc

Rear Brakes

single piston caliper, 220 mm disc

Front Tyres

80/100 21

Rear Tyres

100/100 18

Wheelbase

1400 mm

Seat Height

920 mm

Ground Clearance

315 mm

Kerb Weight

104 kg

Fuel Capacity

9 litres

Dimensions

2110 mm (L) x 830 mm (W) x 1215 mm (H)